magnets in science

  1. A Team From Purdue Has Made the Fastest Spinning Object Ever, In a Vacuum

    A Team From Purdue Has Made the Fastest Spinning Object Ever, In a Vacuum
    A team of researchers from Purdue have measured vacuum friction for the first time in history. By making the fastest spinning object ever with a laser-like 150-nanometer spinning silica ball, this team showed how a tiny ball of silicon dioxide that rotates 300 billion times per second has been able to detect torque, for the first time ever.  Continue reading →
  2. Why Magnetism in Certain Materials is Different in Atomically Thin Layers and Their Bulk Forms

    Why Magnetism in Certain Materials is Different in Atomically Thin Layers and Their Bulk Forms
    A group of researchers led by MIT Department of Physics Professor Pablo Jarillo-Herrero have built on two years of prior research to present us with new findings. Previous research led by researchers at the University of Washington showed that rotating layers of hexagonally-structured graphene at a particular “magic angle” could change the material’s electronic properties from an insulating state to a superconducting state. This time, Jarillo-Herro’s group went deep into 2-D magnets to find if magnetism in certain materials is different in atomically thin layers than in their bulk forms.  Continue reading →
  3. Here’s What Happens When You Heat Paramagnets

    Here’s What Happens When You Heat Paramagnets
    Magnets are a crucial part of collecting energy from heat. When one side of a magnet is heated, the other, cooler side will become more magnetic, which produces spin --flux of magnetism -- and creates electricity. Once paramagnets are heated up, though, nothing happens. That is until an international team of researchers and scientists found a way to capture heat and transform it into electricity using paramagnets, something that wasn’t thought to be possible.  Continue reading →
  4. St. Jude Receives World's Largest Superconducting Magnet for Research

    St. Jude Receives World's Largest Superconducting Magnet for Research
    On September 5th, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, located in Memphis, TN, received the largest superconducting magnet in the world. You may be asking, ”what would a hospital need a 10-ton magnet that’s a million times stronger than the earth’s magnetic field for?” Below, you’ll find your answer.  Continue reading →
  5. Robotic Gripper Uses Magnets to Absorb Shocks

    Robotic Gripper Uses Magnets to Absorb Shocks
    Grip firmness is an important trait of human hands—we have the capability to handle something delicate, such as an egg, but we’re also able to hold a baseball bat with enough strength to hit a baseball and send it flying. Scientists have now found a way to make a robotic hand share this same characteristic.   Continue reading →
  6. Laser Light Turns Metals into Magnets

    Laser Light Turns Metals into Magnets
    Normally, it’s possible for light to transform the properties of a material; however, these properties must exist to be manipulated. Physicists now believe they have found a way to use lasers to transform the properties of a material, creating new properties. Specifically, they have discovered a way to make non-magnetic materials magnetic.  Continue reading →
  7. Magnets Shown to Create More Power than Electrical Generators

    Magnets Shown to Create More Power than Electrical Generators
    By combining permanent magnets and field winding into a wound rotor system, researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to reduce the size of some moderate-to-low electric generators while also increasing the efficiency.  Continue reading →
  8. Scientists Just Accidentally Created a Permanent Magnetic Liquid

    Scientists Just Accidentally Created a Permanent Magnetic Liquid
    For the first time, scientists have created a permanently magnetic liquid. While soft magnets —also known as a ferromagnetic liquid—exist already, this discovery is different. A soft magnet can exist in liquid form when it’s close to magnetic objects, but it only remains magnetized when in the presence of such an object. This magnetic liquid, however, remained magnetized even after...
  9. Building a New Superconducting Magnet

    Building a New Superconducting Magnet
    After the discovery of electromagnets in the 1800s, the world’s understanding and use of magnets started to evolve. However, the next big game changer didn’t occur until 1911 when Kamerlingh Onnes discovered superconductivity. This refers to the zero electrical resistance and expulsion of magnetic fields in some materials (superconductors) at very low absolute temperatures. Superconductors conduct electricity with “perfect” efficiency...
  10. What is the Hall Effect and How Does it Relate to Magnets?

    What is the Hall Effect and How Does it Relate to Magnets?
    American physicist Edwin H. Hall discovered the Hall Effect in 1879 – almost 20 years before we discovered the electron. He was clearly a man before his time because it took several decades for people to catch up to his discovery and fully grasp or understand its importance. Now the concept is used to operate computers, cell phones, cars, and...

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