magnets in science

  1. 3D Printed Precise Magnets Using Special Stainless Steel

    3D Printed Precise Magnets Using Special Stainless Steel
    In what may appear to be no big deal -- but is in fact, a big deal -- 3D printed magnets have been created by using laser beams and metal powder. Empa team, led by Aryan Arabi-Hashemi and Christian Leinenbach, used a special type of stainless steel to precisely 3D print magnets, with a final result looking like a metal chess board. The board is four millimeters long on each side with alternating darker and lighter spots in the shape of squares. Eight of these squares are magnetic and the other eight have non-magnetic properties. Continue reading →
  2. A Breakthrough in Liquid Magnetism - A Quantum Mechanical Mystery

    A Breakthrough in Liquid Magnetism - A Quantum Mechanical Mystery
    A team of researchers working at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a U.S Department of Energy facility Argonne National Laboratory, has been able to show that, by applying slow and steady pressure, some magnetic materials can be pushed into a state similar to a liquid.  Continue reading →
  3. Inducing Magnetism in Graphene

    Inducing Magnetism in Graphene
    While graphene has mechanical, electronic, and optical properties it hasn’t been good for magnetic purposes. Empa researchers and international partners have succeeded in synthesizing nanographene which conclusively demonstrates that carbon in very specific forms has magnetic properties.  What We’ve Known Graphene is non-metallic thanks to its 2-D structure made of carbon. In 2017, we wrote about a study where researchers...
  4. A Team From Purdue Has Made the Fastest Spinning Object Ever, In a Vacuum

    A Team From Purdue Has Made the Fastest Spinning Object Ever, In a Vacuum
    A team of researchers from Purdue have measured vacuum friction for the first time in history. By making the fastest spinning object ever with a laser-like 150-nanometer spinning silica ball, this team showed how a tiny ball of silicon dioxide that rotates 300 billion times per second has been able to detect torque, for the first time ever.  Continue reading →
  5. Why Magnetism in Certain Materials is Different in Atomically Thin Layers and Their Bulk Forms

    Why Magnetism in Certain Materials is Different in Atomically Thin Layers and Their Bulk Forms
    A group of researchers led by MIT Department of Physics Professor Pablo Jarillo-Herrero have built on two years of prior research to present us with new findings. Previous research led by researchers at the University of Washington showed that rotating layers of hexagonally-structured graphene at a particular “magic angle” could change the material’s electronic properties from an insulating state to a superconducting state. This time, Jarillo-Herro’s group went deep into 2-D magnets to find if magnetism in certain materials is different in atomically thin layers than in their bulk forms.  Continue reading →
  6. Here’s What Happens When You Heat Paramagnets

    Here’s What Happens When You Heat Paramagnets
    Magnets are a crucial part of collecting energy from heat. When one side of a magnet is heated, the other, cooler side will become more magnetic, which produces spin --flux of magnetism -- and creates electricity. Once paramagnets are heated up, though, nothing happens. That is until an international team of researchers and scientists found a way to capture heat and transform it into electricity using paramagnets, something that wasn’t thought to be possible.  Continue reading →
  7. St. Jude Receives World's Largest Superconducting Magnet for Research

    St. Jude Receives World's Largest Superconducting Magnet for Research
    On September 5th, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, located in Memphis, TN, received the largest superconducting magnet in the world. You may be asking, ”what would a hospital need a 10-ton magnet that’s a million times stronger than the earth’s magnetic field for?” Below, you’ll find your answer.  Continue reading →
  8. Robotic Gripper Uses Magnets to Absorb Shocks

    Robotic Gripper Uses Magnets to Absorb Shocks
    Grip firmness is an important trait of human hands—we have the capability to handle something delicate, such as an egg, but we’re also able to hold a baseball bat with enough strength to hit a baseball and send it flying. Scientists have now found a way to make a robotic hand share this same characteristic.   Continue reading →
  9. Laser Light Turns Metals into Magnets

    Laser Light Turns Metals into Magnets
    Normally, it’s possible for light to transform the properties of a material; however, these properties must exist to be manipulated. Physicists now believe they have found a way to use lasers to transform the properties of a material, creating new properties. Specifically, they have discovered a way to make non-magnetic materials magnetic.  Continue reading →
  10. Magnets Shown to Create More Power than Electrical Generators

    Magnets Shown to Create More Power than Electrical Generators
    By combining permanent magnets and field winding into a wound rotor system, researchers at Purdue University have come up with a way to reduce the size of some moderate-to-low electric generators while also increasing the efficiency.  Continue reading →

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