Magnet Experiments

  1. Build a Levitating Model Train Track with Magnets

    Build a Levitating Model Train Track with Magnets
    Maglev trains are powered by magnetic levitation technology. If you have ever heard about or ridden on one of these high speed trains, then you may already know that they hover above the track. This is because their design is based on the Meissner effect. When cooled to a super low temperature, superconducting materials like Yttrium-barium-copper-oxide enter a state of zero electrical resistance, expel magnetic fields and can levitate. You can build your own mini Maglev train and track, with a few simple materials and construction. We have outlined some steps and supplies below, however, this method differs from the Maglev train technology. Read on, and see if you can guess how this design is different. Continue reading →
  2. Is It Magnetic? An Experiment

    Is It Magnetic? An Experiment
    Magnetism is an essential science lesson, and you can make teaching about it loads of fun with some creative tools. For a beginner, learning about the complex world of magnetism can seem a bit daunting. However, if you start with the basics and this creative experiment, it should be easier to move onto some more advanced concepts. One of the most basic magnet lessons is figuring out what is and what is not magnetic. In other words, what do magnets attract (besides other magnets)? A fun way to do this is with a magnetic test experiment. Continue reading →
  3. Magnet Experiments: Build a Speaker with Magnets

    Magnet Experiments: Build a Speaker with Magnets
    Can you imagine life without music? Well, without magnets it would be pretty difficult to listen to it. Did you know that magnets are inside speakers and headphones? Magnets allow us to hear the music that we love so much. You can even create your own DIY set of speakers with some magnets and learn a little bit about audio, electricity and science in the process. There are tons of variations on homemade speakers, even a Mason jar version. But, we have created a simple version for those of you that would like to try it out! Continue reading →
  4. Copper Tube and Neodymium Magnet Experiment Explained

    Copper Tube and Neodymium Magnet Experiment Explained
    In a previous blog, we completed a neodymium magnet experiment to see what happens when you drop a bar magnet into a copper tube. Spoiler alert — if you want to try the experiment for yourself first, stop reading and head to this blog. When you complete the age-old “drop a magnet down a tube” trick, you’ll notice something strange...
  5. Magnet Experiment: How to Make an Electromagnet

    Magnet Experiment: How to Make an Electromagnet
    The discovery that electricity and magnetism are closely related goes as far back as the 1820s, when physicist Hans Christian Oersted demonstrated that an electrical current creates a magnetic field capable of deflecting a compass needle. Oersted’s discovery established that there is more than just one type of magnet. Continue reading →
  6. Magnetic Experiment and Lesson Ideas

    Magnetic Experiment and Lesson Ideas
    Magnetism is all around us. It is one of the greatest scientific and natural phenomenons in the world and an important part of science and other learning curriculum. However, it can get a bit complex, so how do we teach students about magnetism without confusing or boring them? Here are a few suggestions and lessons to try to engage and introduce students to the magical world of magnets. Continue reading →
  7. Magnet Experiments: Iron Filings and Neodymium Magnets

    Magnet Experiments: Iron Filings and Neodymium Magnets
    Iron filings are, as their name suggests, filed pieces of iron that look like a metallic powder. Their properties are, in some aspects, similar to ferrofluid, because they form a significant pattern when interacting with a magnet. Magnetic fields are invisible, but the pattern that both substances form represents the lines of a magnetic field. Pairing iron filings and magnets together is probably one of the most common, preliminary experiments used to show magnetism. Despite its commonality it is still an interesting way to display the magnetic field. Conduct your own experiment with iron filings and these simple steps! Continue reading →
  8. Magnet Experiments: Magnetic Levitation of a Superconductor

    Magnet Experiments: Magnetic Levitation of a Superconductor
    In a previous blog we discussed and conducted an experiment showing diamagnetic levitation, the phenomenon that happens when diamagnetic materials levitate in between an arranged magnetic field. In this blog, we’re discussing superconducting levitation with magnets. Superconducting levitation, also known as the Meissner effect, can be considered a “super” form of diamagnetic levitation. A superconducting material like Yttrium-barium-copper-oxide enters a state of zero electrical resistance when it reaches its superconducting point. This state seems to defy gravity by repelling magnetic fields and levitating. In this example, the temperature needed to become a superconductor with perfect diamagnetism is around 93 Kelvin or -180° Celsius. Continue reading →
  9. Magnet Experiments: Opening a Bottle with a Quarter and a Magnet

    Magnet Experiments: Opening a Bottle with a Quarter and a Magnet
    You may have seen a video that shows a bottle cap being popped off using only a fridge magnet and a quarter. The video has been circling the Internet recently and may seem real, but we were pretty skeptical. As magnet-enthusiasts, we naturally had to test out the legitimacy of this bottle opening trick. Continue reading →
  10. Magnet Experiments: What Happens to a Magnet in Cold Temperatures

    Magnet Experiments: What Happens to a Magnet in Cold Temperatures
    High powered magnets can lift cars, and steel beams as well as crush bones or break glass. In other words, magnets are capable of some incredible feats. However, there are a few things that can alter magnet strength. One of those is temperature. In our last blog we explored what happens to a magnet when it is exposed to extreme heat. Now, let’s do an experiment to explore what happens to a magnet when it is exposed to extreme cold. Continue reading →

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